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Old 12-01-2008, 07:24 PM
ASNTCS ASNTCS is offline
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Default Cardinal vs. Ordinal Dates

Cardinal vs. Ordinal Dates

Although dates are pronounced in ordinal fashion, the Chicago Manual of Style, Fifteenth Edition (I can't remember the paragraph number.) requires that written dates be cardinal, i.e. November 28, 2008, and not ordinal , i.e. November 28th 2008.
<br /><br />

Please consider incorporating this language rule into your style.
<br /><br />

Thanks for your consideration,
<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />



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Old 12-02-2008, 08:26 AM
alandwalker alandwalker is offline
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Errr... but why would an Irish company be interested in what Chicago wants??
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Old 12-02-2008, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alandwalker View Post
Errr... but why would an Irish company be interested in what Chicago wants??
And the International Standard says dates should be written as 2008-11-28 so why do we follow a "local" standard at all?
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Old 12-02-2008, 07:10 PM
ASNTCS ASNTCS is offline
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Default Re: Cardinal vs. Ordinal Dates

--Because the Chicago Manual of Style is the foremost internationally recognized style on English.

Sure, I pledge allegiance in the metric system, ASTM E29 (Significant Digits), and YYYY-MM-DD and other common-sense style, but I have to live in this country (USA) and conform to its style.

In terms of Semantic Proportionalism, the USA is the most important country in the world in the quantity of its English speakers:

1) USA 251M
2) India 90M
3) Nigeria 79M

thus, the USA style holds precedence.

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Old 12-03-2008, 01:19 AM
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Rubbish. I suppose next you'll say the US gallon and reporting temperatures in Fahrenheit are also to hold supreme?
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Old 12-03-2008, 09:20 AM
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I don't see what the big deal is with the "th" after e.g. "28" anyway? I'm sure you have no problem understand what date that is about.

The rest of the world (non English) have more trouble understanding what dates e.g. 12-01-2008 is referring to. I understand the last digits are the year, also because dates are often written with the year coming last also. But the rest of the world have problem knowing if the day is "12" or "1". So it could be January 12 (or 12th) for anybody in the non English world. Even more trouble would 12-01-08 give. And that has nothing to do with languages as it is all numerical.
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Old 12-03-2008, 08:28 PM
ASNTCS ASNTCS is offline
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Default Cardinal vs. Ordinal, English vs. Metric

<Rubbish. I suppose next you'll say the US gallon and reporting temperatures in Fahrenheit are also to hold supreme?>

--You may speak or write English, but you can't seem to comprehend it.

Given that I espouse the metric system, I also espouse using liters instead of gallons, and centigrade instead of fahrenheit. But I really prefer the kelvin scale, which is also metric.

If speaking to a Spaniard, I speak Spanish. If writing a Brit, I use the British term, "grey," instead of the American spelling, "gray."

***

<I don't see what the big deal is with the "th" after e.g. "28" anyway? I'm sure you have no problem understand what date that is about.>

--It would be nice to know the origins, though.

The big deal is that there is a written and world-wide accepted standard, the Chicago Manual of Style. It wouldn't matter if it came from London or New Delhi.

I live in Chicago and have argued with the CMS editor about including discussion about significant digits, delineated in ASTM E29.
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Old 12-04-2008, 01:21 AM
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The Kelvin scale is strictly for scientific applications, since none of us humans are likely to have experienced 0K (or ever to experience it for that matter as it's theoretically the total absence of thermal energy, not exactly conducive to life as we know it). The kelvin as a unit is exactly the same as the centigrade.

For those who are interested and need a reason to adopt the Celsius scale :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari...erature_scales

In any case, your beef concerns what exactly in relation to Statcounter or this forum?


BTW, <br /> doesn't work in forum posts here.
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Old 12-04-2008, 12:27 PM
davep4hpg davep4hpg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASNTCS View Post
--Because the Chicago Manual of Style is the foremost internationally recognized style on English.
ASNTCS
er..., no. It may the foremost whatever, but it started as and remains a specialist publication on American English. America might be a big country, that doesn't mean it's always right or best or that we all have to adopt it's standards. The earlier question of why should an Irish Company adopt an American standard seems valid to me. If Statcounter is to adhere to any standards, IS would seem more realistic than some arbitary American journalistic reference manual, although I find some IS recommendations to be plain silly.

As for the arrogant assertion that,

Quote:
Originally Posted by ASNTCS View Post
In terms of Semantic Proportionalism, the USA is the most important country in the world in the quantity of its English speakers:

1) USA 251M
2) India 90M
3) Nigeria 79M

thus, the USA style holds precedence.
only an American, or someone who's lived there too long, could actually believe that America is that important just because it's bigger than anyone else
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Old 12-04-2008, 12:42 PM
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May want to take a look at these stats:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languag..._United_States
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