Hyper Text Style Sheet.....What is it?

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#1
Making web pages as I do, well I know it is not conventional. That said......yeah I know. I have discovered that Front Page will save as a Hyper Text Style Sheet. What exactly is that? When you first save it as that, you can browse it, but if you close it then re open it shows up as html code.

Is this style sheet then linked somehow to another page, like the html page. There is a link to the princess.css file on the bottom left of the page.

Here is what I was working on. http://alexupload.home.att.net/princess.html


PS, It might be a nice feature on this forum to offer a search forum for text inside posts. I have been thinking I want to go back and down load that program for css that someone posted a while back, also the css templates they posted, was that Jonra?

Anyway can't seem to find the thread.
 
#2
Sharron said:
PS, It might be a nice feature on this forum to offer a search forum for text inside posts. I have been thinking I want to go back and down load that program for css that someone posted a while back, also the css templates they posted, was that Jonra?

Anyway can't seem to find the thread.
Click on "Search" and then choose the option "Display results as: posts" when making the search
 
#3
Hmmm.. .whatever FrontPage did is of course not a style sheet at all, why it would call it a css file, who knows. It's obviously just your own page, the same exact one you have up on the web.

I haven't used FrontPage so I cannot be any more intelligent about it, but methinks it's buggy :lol:
 
#4
Proteus said:
Sharron said:
PS, It might be a nice feature on this forum to offer a search forum for text inside posts. I have been thinking I want to go back and down load that program for css that someone posted a while back, also the css templates they posted, was that Jonra?

Anyway can't seem to find the thread.
Click on "Search" and then choose the option "Display results as: posts" when making the search


gosh can anyone be any more blind. Sorry
 
#5
Sharron, seriously, you could take a quick course about webdesign and make an extra income designing websites from home... more than a webdesign, an artwork... that's what I love from websites.
 
#6
chrisooc said:
why it would call it a css file, who knows.
But, apparently, they don't call it that. (fortunately) A "HyperText Style Sheet" could be anything they might want it to be (including, I suppose, CSS). CSS is "Cascading Style Sheet", but "style sheet" is a fairly generic term that's been around in the printing world long before the developers of CSS applied their unique interpretation to the term. FrontPage has also been around for longer than CSS, so this might be some kind of legacy term. And, although the "HT" in "HTML" stands for "hypertext", that is also a generic term of which HTML was but one example when Berners-Lee introduced it.

But, whatever it means in this instance, it doesn't appear in this glossary of FrontPage terms.

So, I too am at a loss. I tried out FrontPage several years ago and ran from it in horror... largely because of who-knows-what-that-might-be proprietary notions like "HyperText Style Sheet".
 
#7
Proteus said:
Sharron, seriously, you could take a quick course about webdesign and make an extra income designing websites from home... more than a webdesign, an artwork... that's what I love from websites.
Thanks, what sort of faster.... I mean quick course are you talking about? Websign in general or a particular format, like css, php or is that even what they are called...formats.

I would love to make money!
 
#9
Well the version of Front Page I use has save as Hyper Text Template in addition to activer server page, web pages, front page template and of course the hyper text style sheet, which when choosed saves with the .css extension.

But I don't think you were asking me, haha

I am off to count sheep night
 
#10
Sharron said:
Well the version of Front Page I use has save as Hyper Text Template in addition to activer server page, web pages, front page template and of course the hyper text style sheet, which when choosed saves with the .css extension.

But I don't think you were asking me, haha

I am off to count sheep night
just a dvery dum notion - I think it's pretty silly and allows you to save as any extension but it's up to you to make srue the contents match the extension.

Dreamweaver allows me to save as php for insatnce, but it won't check that what I have is valid php.
 
#11
It looks like Robinev and Christina are right - the program allowed you to give an incorrect extension to the file. It's a straight html file and when you change the extension it loads properly in the browser.

There is one thing I did notice in the code that should be changed. The statcounter code is between the closing head tag and the opening body tag. There should be nothing in the code of an html file that is not either in the head or the body section except for the doc declaration at the beginning of the file.

Thanks, what sort of faster.... I mean quick course are you talking about? Websign in general or a particular format, like css, php or is that even what they are called...formats.
Sharron, there is no one course that will tell you all you need to know about developing a commercial site. My advise would be to start at the beginning and study 3 areas - usabililty, html, and css. You can always outsource the programming to someone else until you have a chance to study database design and php.

An hour spent on www.websitesthatsuck.com and www.useit.com will put you ahead of the majority of site developers out there when it comes to designing a usable site.

Html is fairly easy to learn, since it's really just a tag based layout language similar to the earliest word processors. You need to know html, because even though you can use a wsywyg editor to create pages you need to know how to find problems in code view. A book like 'html for dummies' would have more than enough information to get you going.

CSS is the easiest of all to learn. Start by learning the font properties and then learn about positioning. I doubt it would take more than a couple of evenings to bring you up to speed.

Of course, there is a lot more you can learn about designing web sites than what I've posted here. There is the 'small' matter of planning also. This involves determining what information is needed to accomplish the goals for the site. This isn't about your goals or your client's goals, it's about the user's goals and how to satisfy any needs they might have in the simplest way possible.

There are hundreds, probably thousands, of tutorials on the web for all of the above. A quick search on google will list plenty of useful resources. You've also got everyone here, who I'm sure would be more than happy to help out.

I say, 'go for it'. You've got a great design sense and you've shown real talent when it comes to creating goodlooking designs. The html and all of the rest is really fairly easy to learn. All it takes is time. :)

John
 
#12
chrisooc said:
Might they be using Hypertext Style Sheet to mean a template???
Yes, it's supposed be used for CSS templates. You can save a CSS file as template or use pre-formated templates that comes with Frontpage. I don't know anything about this, but find it on http://www.umaine.edu/phoebe/DesignTools.htm 8)
FrontPage offers several pre-formatted style sheet templates and gives a brief description of each style sheet. To use a style sheet template, click on File, New, Page, and Style Sheets -- select a style sheet and click OK. Formatting codes will be added to your page. Now save the formatted page as a style sheet. Click on File and Save As. In the Save as type drop-down box, select HyperText Style Sheet. FrontPage will add the style sheet extension .css to your file name.
 
#13
jonra01 said:
An hour spent on websitesthatsuck.com and useit.com will put you ahead of the majority of site developers out there when it comes to designing a usable site.

A book like 'html for dummies' would have more than enough information to get you going.

There are hundreds, probably thousands, of tutorials on the web for all of the above. A quick search on google will list plenty of useful resources. You've also got everyone here, who I'm sure would be more than happy to help out.
No, no, no... I mean a proper course like in a tech school...
 
#15
No, no, no... I mean a proper course like in a tech school...
Then she would have to unlearn about half of what they teach her before she could build a decent site.

I have a young friend who just finished getting a university degree in computer science. Part of her studies included web design. She showed me the materials they used in the course - full of misinformation, bad advice, and dated technologies. She told me she learned more from me in a couple of hours than she learned in 2 semesters on the same subject at the university. I loaned her a few books from my library that were much more appropriate than the study materials they recommended.

John
 
#16
oh well.... I didn't know that schools teachings aren't updated... nevermind then... but I still think that Sharron has a gift in web art design...
 
#17
jonra01 said:
She told me she learned more from me in a couple of hours than she learned in 2 semesters on the same subject at the university. I loaned her a few books from my library that were much more appropriate than the study materials they recommended.
And that's an all-too-frequent problem, isn't it? The point of college should be (in the opinion of this old philosophy major) to learn how to learn. But too many courses are turned into just a dump of obsolete data. Pity.

I'm convinced I learned more that remains relevant to me today by reading Plato and Nietzsche and Wittgenstein and Rawles all those years ago instead of trying to tackle Fortran and Basic on a DEC mini.
 
#18
The point of college should be (in the opinion of this old philosophy major) to learn how to learn.
I agree, Robin. I've long believed that the best thing we can do for the young is to teach them to question everything. Very few sources of information are ever 100% correct. This means that no matter what we believe, we are basing those beliefs, in part, on false information.

One other huge weakness in our method of learning is based on 'what' we are taught. If all we learn of is "A", even though there are alternative possibilities, then we believe "A" is true. If we are shown "A", "B", and "C" then we might come to a different conclusion. I believe this is why people come to believe that the religion they learn as a child is the only 'true' religion.

John
 
#19
jonra01 said:
If we are shown "A", "B", and "C" then we might come to a different conclusion.
Exactly. But another the problem arises when we have politicians who, by nature, don't want us to see "A" or "C" if they get an advantage from "B" and then reinforce "B" through media and even through their control of the educational purse-strings.
 
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